universal standard

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Universal Standard is a brand that I do like, but don’t LOVE. I appreciate their mission to dress all bodies in size 0-40, because that isn’t happening enough, but I do wish that there were more items available and that they had a bit more variety in style.

A further exploration of that is for another time. For now, I wanted to briefly explore the size dropdown menu on Universal Standard product pages.

Here is a typical product page. This time for these cute Sava jeans.

On the right are the typical buttons, for selecting your size and then to add the item to your cart.

Here’s where I get confused. How is this the choice that they have made regarding the size dropdown? With so many sizes available, why has no effort been made to abbreviate the effort to find a larger size? There is clearly plenty of space to create columns in order to avoid this.

I was especially surprised to see this clunky presentation of size choices when I saw this “quick shop” feature on a page with a number of products:

This DEFINITELY needs to be replicated on the individual product page. It’s much cleaner and more concise than the incredibly long, space-wasting dropdown that is currently on the website.

Let me know how you would improve this dropdown on Twitter or in the comments below.

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Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

Today, I’m sharing a surprising email that I received from Universal Standard, a clothing company that has achieved more notoriety in recent time. They offer clothing in sizes 10-28, and the items are meant to be high-quality basics, in the best possible way.

From their website:

Polina Veksler and Alexandra Waldman started Universal Standard because size had become the dividing line determining who had the privilege and freedom to dress with quality and style.

That had to change, so they changed it.

Starting with the premise that clothes should look and feel good, they created a line of modern essentials, with a chic, downtown but classic aesthetic – giving women a new standard in style and experience.

The email they sent was dedicated to an explanation of their pricing and how it compares to pricing for similarly created items. Check it out below.

This is new and interesting! As someone who doesn’t buy tops that cost $200, it’s interesting to see this breakdown. The question that popped up for me immediately is to ask where these items are made. I checked on the website and didn’t find anything about where the items are made, which is a bit frustrating.

However, I don’t think I have ever seen such transparency in an email, and I opened it immediately. I have been on Universal Standard’s email list for a while and I am sure I will buy something from them eventually, and this email only helps me toward making a purchase.

Tweet me and let me know if you would be affected by an email of this nature!

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