email marketing

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I was obsessed with nail polish for a while. I had stopped biting my nails after a long time of doing so, and it became fun to paint my longer nails. However, over time, it started to feel less fun and more like work. I ended up disseminating most of the nail polish I had collected to friends and family and kept a small amount for me.

However, I have tried to keep in touch with Zoya (AKA Art of Beauty) because they have great nail polish and lots of lovely colors. I tend to buy nail polish for my mom at least once a year and Zoya is one of my go-to brands.

I ordered in November of 2020 in preparation for the holidays, and waited actual weeks for my items to arrive. This is not the first time that it seems that this company is a bit incapable of hiring additional staff during periods of higher sale volume, but I’m not actually here to talk about that today.

Instead, I want to address the insert that I received in the package with my items.

The first image is fine. They are asking for my input on the packaging of my items and helpfully letting me know that the peanuts are not Styrofoam. Great.

Then I turned it over and read what is a VERY UNFORTUNATE message about what my email provider is doing. The initial messaging about promotional emails being sorted into different folders is not terrible, but it really goes off the rails in the second paragraph. “Or is it maybe because they can’t generate advertising dollars because you’ll shop at Zoya.com instead of somewhere they can track or make money from your clicks. We’re not sure but the person that suffers is you!”

Whoa.

That middle paragraph is completely unnecessary and feels like it was written by a very angry marketer. The whole thing feels incredibly aggressive and ends up with Zoya looking very bad, at least to me.

Let’s rewrite this to get the message across without the rage.

Are you not seeing emails from Zoya? Let us help!

Many email providers have filters in place to assist in sorting your email inbox, which can send your Zoya emails to promotions folders or even the spam folder.

We have heard from Zoya customers that they miss our emails, and so we have created a guide for making sure that our emails will make it into your inbox! Please visit the link below and follow the instructions there so that we can continue to share information on new products, and of course, our special offers and sales!

www.zoya.com/whitelist

I’m sure I would perhaps edit what I’ve just written above, but I think it’s a much better presentation of the information. It just didn’t have to be SO negative and SO angry-sounding.

I haven’t ordered from Zoya since I received this insert because I’m not sure about them as a company. To allow for mass production of a message like this is a decision I find questionable.

Perhaps they will see this blog post and adjust this messaging in the future.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Shop Wright Promo Email | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on March 19, 2021

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I am definitely a bit of a Frank Lloyd Wright-ophile. I have visited a few of his most famous buildings, most recently having made the journey to Spring Green, Wisconsin, to see Taliesin, his personal home for many years. (Unrelated to this specific post—Frank had a bit of a scandalous existence, but also went through some unimaginable horrors. I really enjoyed the Ken Burns documentary about him, which clocks in at around two and a half hours.)

My interest in Frank Lloyd Wright has led to me being signed up for many different relevant mailing lists. One of them is the Frank Lloyd Wright e-commerce destination ShopWright.org. However, you can pop over here if you wish to have the best order-fulfillment service for your start-up business.

I received an email from them recently and opened it to see what items were featured. Let’s get into it.

I have issues with a few things here.

  • I don’t like the names of the plates here. I would like to see the size name at the front, and then an actual measurement so that I can get a better idea of scale here in the email.
    • Small Ginkgo Leaves Plate, 4.25″
    • Large Ginkgo Leaves Plates, 8.75″
  • There is a lack of grammatical consistency, particularly with punctuation marks. There are variable amounts of spacing around dashes and an oddly-placed period after “origami chair.” Here’s how I would re-write these:
    • Barista 12-Hour Tree of Life Travel Mug
    • Limited-Edition Taliesin West Origami Chair
    • Ginkgo Leaves Napkin Rings, Set of 4

Right off the bat here, you can see a promo for “all face masks are 12.99” with a floating image of a mask, but it is behind the image of the mailbox? It’s possible that this is just an error with this email in Gmail, but something there is awry. Clicking the image of the mailbox takes you to the face mask page. Something isn’t right.

The mailbox is very lovely but I would prefer to see the “back in stock” messaging on the image instead of in the text. Additionally, the text is a different font and size than the other product names, and the mailbox listing doesn’t have a “buy now” button, which is inconsistent.

I also have similar issues with the product naming here. Here are my suggestions for these:

  • Beachy House Locking Steel Mailbox
  • Deluxe Patinated Copper and White Birdhouse
  • Floral Bird Feeder in Slate Blue
    • Although I struggle with the inclusion of the color here since a click through lets you see that this bird feeder is only available in that one color. (UPDATE: shopping later on this site led me to discover other color options, but they aren’t grouped onto one product page! That is something to be fixed as well.)

Finally, I discovered another issue here that bothered me – the images for these items don’t link to the item! I clicked the bird feeder and got this:

I am kind of obsessed with this feeder, but if I click the image, I want to go to the page where I can buy the item.

Let’s continue.

I have similar issues here with the product naming, so let’s get those fixes out of the way.

  • Pagoda Lantern Sandstone Outdoor Sculpture
  • Healing Gong Wind Chime
  • Midway Gardens Sandstone Sprite with Scepter, 64″
    • This last one is a bit long but since the Midway Gardens was such an important project for FLW, it seems appropriate to mention it in the name. Another version may also want to include the word “reproduction” in the product name in this email, but I’m leaving it out for the time being since it is clearly indicated on the product page this information links to.

The link to shop all outdoor accessories is a smart choice, given that the subject line of this email refers to spring and it is prime time to buy outdoor decor.

I make it down to the footer message about what my purchases support, and I see it as a missed opportunity for links. I see below that I can link directly to flwright.org, but a direct link to the “education and preservation programs” that I would be supporting might really engage me to want to justify buying more things.

All in all, this email did do the basic job of showing me some things that I might want to purchase to get my home into the spring spirit. The issues I ran across are easily fixable.

This post is about the email, so I won’t go further than that for now, but I also definitely noticed some issues within the actual shopwright.org e-commerce shop as well, but that is for another day.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

It’s a weird time to be trying to sell things like food. However, I appreciate this content from the Wendy’s team, for a day in April where you could get a free 4-piece chicken nuggets in the drive through.

“Group nug” is a winner and more importantly, mid-late April was a time where I’m sure that fast food retailers were all doing their best to improve sales at drive-through windows while also making customers feel safe and comfortable.

Also, the humor of “doing your own hairstyling and your own teaching and your own literally everything else” is relatable and also covers almost every possible version of the lockdown experience.

They should give 100 nuggets to anyone having to be their kids’ teacher though. đŸ™‚

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

Sometimes, I see things that I would like to blog about, and then I take a screenshot and forget about it.

I recently found a bunch of those things, and so if I post those, I’m going to label them as throwbacks and go with it.

I have actually nothing to complain about with this one, it was just an example of email content that I really enjoyed! (This was long before the internet canceled Too Faced.)

Back in 2018, Too Faced collaborated with YouTube queen Kandee Johnson on a makeup collection that was available exclusively at Ulta.

This email came to me from Ulta, and I was blown away by how good this content is! The team at Too Faced (and perhaps also Ulta, as the exclusive partner) really put a lot of thought and effort into this. One of my biggest issues with almost any makeup product that is released onto the market in our current times is that the brands don’t provide enough of their own content on how to use that product. If you are introducing an eyeshadow palette with 20 shades in it, I want access to at least 4 tutorials on how to create different looks with those 20 colors.

I digress. This email has it all – product images, beauty shots of Kandee, color swatches, tips from Kandee about the products, and links to video content as well! I wish I remembered more about how this collection performed, because I hope that this level of support for a product launch was rewarded with success in sales.

I’m inserting a lot of this email down below so that I can share it in all of its glory.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Tory Burch New Year Email | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on January 16, 2019

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

In follow-up to my previous post about the Year in Review email from Lyft, I’m back now with a Tory Burch email to wish me a happy new year. Unlike the Lyft email, this is not personalized to me, but still feels like a personal note from the founder and namesake, Tory Burch.

The only issue I take with this messaging is that it is extremely top-line and vague. I would almost prefer more information in this email with some links to more information about their philanthropic projects, as I’m sure they’ve created content around those efforts. I do really like the message of “here’s to a year of travel, color, and giving back,” as it feels extremely on-brand for Tory Burch, in aesthetic and company reputation.

I’m including the whole email below, but everything under the happy new year message is fairly standard e-commerce email content. I do feel that it takes away from the overall message of the email to include such basic content after such a specific message at the top. Ultimately, I would have preferred that this email be paired with more content about the Tory Burch Foundation, and for them to have left the shopping links for next time.

Take a look at this Tory Burch email below.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }