warby parker

Warby Parker Emails | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on August 13, 2015

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I’m back with a look at the emails I received from Warby Parker during my Home Try-On process. To see part 1 of my Warby Parker experience, click here.

Please note that the screenshots in this post are maximized for viewing on JamieSanford.com and are quite large!

The confirmation email is a continuation of the look of the website, and certainly isn’t shy about LARGE images of the frames you just ordered. I also like the “your order should arrive within 5 business days,” which is a good way to give a timeline but still be vague enough with “should.”

Some issues arise with the shipping email. The screenshot is from the version I saw when I clicked “view as web page,” and I’m not sure why the address information and the tracking number don’t come over. It looks like I’m being sent to the online template for this email. The information was in the actual email, but I don’t recommend offering it as a web page and then having that version be different.

I do REALLY like the indication that the tracking number will be active within one business day. From my experience, some customers receive shipping emails and think the package should be trackable immediately, not understanding that while someone has assembled your order, labeled it, and left it for shipping, but that is has not been scanned in during pickup yet. I’m sure that this message saves Warby Parker a lot of emails and phone calls.

This experience is the same as the shipping email. I use the web page version to take screenshots, and the personalized information does NOT fill in on the web version. The frames I ordered are included in the actual email.

Two days after the “how are those frames treating you” email, I received this one prompting me to share images of myself in the frames on social media, using the hashtag #WarbyHomeTryOn. I am super confused as to why this information wasn’t included in the email from two days prior, asking about how the frames were treating me. (There IS a whole thing about sharing and the hashtag in the package the test frames come in, which will be shown in the next post.) Why would WP not push the social stuff right away? Maybe not a big to-do in every email, but it certainly seems that all correspondence should include the hashtag somewhere.

I did narrow it down to two frames and then posted this image on Instagram. I received lots of opinions here and on Facebook, and the Clark frames on the right are the winners! The social aspect of the home try-on is definitely a win.

Next up, the packaging review, coming next week.

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Warby Parker Website | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on July 30, 2015

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I have been in need of an update to my vision prescription for too long. I recently went to the eye doctor and was excited to try out Warby Parker for eyeglasses. I recently completed the at-home try on service.

Please note that the screenshots in this post are maximized for viewing on JamieSanford.com and are quite large!

The Warby Parker homepage is quite beautiful. It’s clean, simple, with navigation that is easy to find and understand. The try-on program is easy to find, as well as their policy of giving away a pair of glasses to someone who needs them for each pair that is purchased. Thumbs up for charity.

The home try-on page has a scrolling look at how it works, that I found easy to follow and lovely to look at. I know from experience that presenting the steps in a process like this isn’t easy, and this is so well done.

Here’s a look at the drop down menu, from clicking “women” in the main navigation bar. Warby Parker takes advantage of the space to make the menu choices visual, which I appreciate.

I arrive at the page with all glasses for women, and the presentation is simple and clean. The filters at the top are clear and easy-to-use, and I am happy there is a filter to only show the glasses you can get for the home try-on.

Unfortunately, when I choose the filter for “available for home try-on,” it doesn’t edit the options available underneath the frames. I would love to have this process be simpler than having to go to each individual product page for each frame and add to my try-on box from there. Choosing 5 by checking them off on the page showing them all would be faster and easier.

The product page for each frame follows the clean and elegant feel of the website. Clear information, lots of images, including one on a real human that you can turn to view the frames from multiple angles.

I add them, and get the confirmation in place of the “add to cart” button, which is really good placement. Again, I’m happy with how this is treated here, but I really think that choosing all 5 of the frames for the home trial would be easier to manage on a single page.

The cart. I really like the touch here of offering me other frame recommendations, because I have only chosen 4 and the maximum is 5. (I later found out that the box they send is also designed to accommodate 5 frames.) Once I chose an additional one, the recommendation bar disappears. There’s also the weirdly lazy option to just let them fill your box with random frames. I’m wondering how much research they’ve done to measure consumer behavior and purchase patterns when they are exposed to 2 pairs to try on vs. 5. Plus, the shipping cost of the box is probably negligible between 2 and 5 frames, so I’m assuming this is a winning scenario for Warby Parker.

Side note – I suggest picking 5 frames and trying to make them as different as you can. I picked 2 pairs that I was pretty sure would not work, but I’ve been surprised before so I went for variety.

The checkout page continues the look and feel and was pretty painless. I utilized AmEx Payments to fill in my information, which I had never used before. It was quite simple and fast.

I commend Warby Parker for their look and feel, that’s certainly a win. The only issue, as I mentioned, was that I thought the process of choosing glasses to try was a bit clunky, and unnecessarily, given that it would be a simple edit to their website to accommodate choosing all of the frames from a single page.

I will be following up with posts about the emails I received from them, as well as the packaging of my home try-on order, and the process of choosing the winning frames.

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Warby Parker x DonorsChoose.org

by Jamie Sanford on July 25, 2013

I’m very into brands that find a way to give to someone else because of a purchase made. Warby Parker is one of the brands that has discovered that 1, people like not overpaying for glasses and 2, it’s even better when a purchase I would make anyway benefits someone else. In this instance, someone in need gets a pair of glasses too.

DonorsChoose.org Founder Charles Best with DonorsChoose.org Supporter, Actress Mindy Kaling

DonorsChoose.org is a wonderful idea that allows teachers in public schools to submit microfunding requests. They are vetted by the site and then launched. Here are the DC FAQs.

You can see a pair of sunglasses on both Charles and Mindy above, these are the new Gardner sunglasses – and in addition to the pair of glasses that WP would already be donating to a person in need, $30 will go to DonorsChoose.org – and the customer gets to choose which project they want to support. It’s a win-win-win-win situation.

From Warby Parker:

Both Warby Parker and DonorsChoose.org are steeped in the idea of empowering consumers to make smart choices for a larger purpose. With this in mind, we designed one of our most flattering sunglasses yet, the Gardner. The angular shape—detailed with a school bus yellow-inspired line—universally suits teachers’ pets, playground rascals, and even comedy writers, like DonorsChoose.org supporter Mindy Kaling.

Kaling first donated after soliciting charity suggestions on Twitter to celebrate her birthday. DonorsChoose.org caught her eye because, she says, “You’re making an impact directly to a small group of people and really tangibly and quickly changing their lives. You don’t have the feeling like ‘Oh, I want to help, but there’s so much bureaucratic stuff between me and actually helping.’”

This collaboration launches TODAY on WarbyParker.com. If you’re looking for sunglasses, look no further, and check them out here.

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