historical

Napoleon House New Orleans | In My Travels

by Jamie Sanford on March 22, 2017

To see all of my travel posts, click here.

All images taken with the Sony NEX-6. (The previous link is an affiliate link, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using this link.)

I’m not a big drinker. Like many others, I had a few moments I regret in college (and maybe a few after), but for the most part, I will go weeks at a time without a drink. My favorite alcoholic mixed drink is a Pimm’s Cup, and whenever they are on the menu, I’m definitely ordering one.

During our trip to New Orleans, we didn’t plan very well, and so on the night we tried to go to K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen, there was a long wait. We were directed to go down the street to Napoleon House. Little did we know that we were walking into our new favorite bar.

Come on. It’s so perfect that you have to go in.

Everything looks as old as it is.

I’m including both images for a full look at the tile details in the entryway.

It is very dark in the Napoleon House, so the next few images are a bit questionable. Don’t let that stop you!

Here’s the look when you walk in the front door. Even with the blur, you can almost taste the air in this bar. It’s incredibly atmospheric.

From the Napoleon House website:

For almost two centuries, the beloved landmark, The Napoleon House, on the corner of Chartres and St. Louis streets in the historical French Quarter of New Orleans, exudes a European charm that is a mecca for civilized drinking and eating. Its vibrant history prevails-the optimistic plot to provide refuge for the exiled Napoleon Bonaparte by the original owner, Nicholas Girod, Mayor of New Orleans from 1812 to 1815, did not come to pass for the emperor. The building has been known as the Napoleon House ever since, either as an Italian grocery store to a restaurant with countless servings of the signature Pimm’s Cup and long list of classic Creole favorites.

Multiple Pimm’s Cups! I went for the original, multiple times. (Perhaps before I took this photo.)

We had to leave Napoleon House before we wanted to, as we got the call that our table was ready down the street. However, we definitely went back the following night before we had dinner reservations at Sylvain.

Old and new(ish) combine well.

A bar with lamps! Does it get better?

Will is having a Pimm’s Cup here as well. Normally he goes for the Sazerac, a New Orleans classic.

In what is one of my new happy places in the world, with my favorite beverage.

I cannot wait to go back to New Orleans. I know that all of our trips there will mean multiple stops at the Napoleon House.

Happy trails!

Hilton Hotels

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Horseshoe Curve | In My Travels

by Jamie Sanford on August 22, 2016

To see all of my travel posts, click here. All images taken with the Sony NEX-6. (The previous link is an affiliate link, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using this link.)

I worked my way around the map once we had decided to go to Penn’s Cave. My first inclination was to spend the night in Harrisburg, but once I realized that adding a bit of driving to the trip would let us visit Horseshoe Curve and then stay in Altoona for the evening, it was the obvious plan. We had been to Horseshoe Curve once before, in 2009 when we took a visit to the Laurel Highlands region of Pennsylvania. I felt that we hadn’t spent enough time there, and I really wanted to go back, so we did!

We rode the funicular to the top of Horseshoe Curve. We took the steps on the way back down.

A panorama from the top. You can see the train tracks on either side of the image, because this photo is taken from the center of the Horseshoe.

Horseshoe Curve was built as a way to stretch out an incline on the railroad in a time when the engines weren’t strong enough to manage a steeper incline with lots of weight. This line of track is used a LOT, and so both times when we have visited, there are trains coming by every few minutes.

Train!

The parklike area at the top of the funicular is so lovely – there are benches, picnic tables, and lots of grass.

In this image, you can really see how this stretch of track is managing the incline.

Obviously. That’s my new road trip hat.

This informational sign is helpful.

On our way back down the stairs.

If you or someone you know likes trains, I can’t tell you enough to spend some time at Horseshoe Curve. I didn’t go into detail about it here, but there is an entire museum to look around, a film to watch about the conception and construction of the curve, and a very cute gift shop. I have found that while it seems like it might be boring to watch trains go by, it is the experience of being surrounded by them as they pass that is really fun and exciting. We saw multiple freight trains and an Amtrak passenger train, which looked tiny in comparison. It was a beautiful day and a beautiful visit.

Happy trails!

Hilton Hotels

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Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.